Accommodation

Where are we sleeping during this event?

The accommodation for the event can vary depending on the time of year we ride and the cost.

Over the years we have held this event we have stayed at Campsites, Private lodges, Fire stations, Rugby Clubs and Hotels. So be prepared to rough it for a night or 2.

In 2017 we only camped out on the 1st night and the rest we stayed in Hotels and Private Lodges. The main aim is to have accommodation where riders can shower and get a good nights sleep, without it costing pushing the costs up.

Clothing

What Cycle clothing will I need?

We will be starting reasonably early each day and depending on pace can see us riding onto in the evening.

So you need to think about that as well. Also, think about keeping warm when we stop for lunch or a break.

Arm & Knee warmers are a good compromise as you can use these to keep you warm and then pop them off quickly, rather than having to wait until we have caught up with the support van to change as you are under or overdressed.

Being too hot is just as horrible as being too cold is!

 

Its England, in the summer, there is a possibility it might rain.

You’ll need to be prepared for all types of weather.


Wet Weather Gear

  • A Rain Jacket
  • Overshoes
  • Base Layers
  • Longs/bib tights
  • Long Gloves
  • Warm Socks

The beauty of Lycra / Proper cycling gear, is that even if you do get wet you should stay warm. Also if it stops raining it all dries out reasonably quickly.

 

Overcast / Cold Day

  • Long Sleeve Jersey, Gillet or Jacket
  • Base Layer or two
  • Longs or ¾ Bib Shorts
  • Warm Socks or Overshoes if you feel the cold.
  • Warm Gloves.

 

Hot Day

  • Cycling Jersey
  • Micro / Mesh Base Layer
  • Bib shorts
  • Socks
  • Cycling Mitts
  • Sun Cream

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

First Aid / Medical

First Aid / Medical

Please bring any medication you need prescription or otherwise. This may include inhalers for asthma, antihistamines for hay fever or even paracetamol if you are prone to headaches if dehydrated.

If you are allergic to anything please let someone know.

If you have an issue of any kind don’t suffer in silence. I may be able to help, even if your sweaty balls hurt I won’t need to look but I might have something to help. I am a first aider but also a combat medic so have dealt with all sorts.

If you are in pain stop! You will ache, you will get niggles that is the nature of the challenge but pain is not normal. Better to stop and have a couple of hours rest in the truck than to put yourself out of action for a couple of days.

Do not take painkillers to mask pain. Pain is there to tell you to stop doing whatever it is that hurts, masking it causes more problems. Treat the problem not the pain.

Under no circumstances should you take any other person’s medication prescribed or otherwise.

 

Rider Costs

Rider Cost for 2020

Currently, we do not have a firm figure on costs for the event, but we do aim to keep it as affordable as possible.

Rider Etiquette

Looking After Each Other

This is not a solo effort. The goal is to get everybody to the finish. So look after each other.

If you are feeling strong, sit on the front of the group, shield the others from the wind. The second rider in a group will use 20% less energy, this goes all the way down through the group. Where the guy at the back can free wheel, not pedal and still keep up.

Keep your eye on those around you that are having a bad day. A kind word or a little push up a hill can do wonders for the moral of somebody who is struggling.

 

Don’t leave a tired rider on their own.

Share your water, food, energy gel’s if you think somebody is struggling and in need.

If you think somebody is struggling and their health is at risk. Tell somebody.

If as a rider you feel you are struggling, you should let somebody know. That way we can help you get to the finish. Don’t suffer in silence.

 

Written by Dave Gillard

Remember this is a charity cycle ride!

You will need to be on your best behaviour.

Please remember while you are on this ride you are doing so as Team TWWB and how you act and react, reflects back on Team TWWB and the charities we are raising money for.

All riders must

  • Ride safely and in their limits.
  • Follow the highway code.
  • Follow support crew instructions at all times.
  • If asked to do so get in the broom wagon.

 

 

Rider Training

If you struggle with hills

  • There’s no shame in having a triple on the front.
  • Fit something bigger than a 25 tooth sprocket on the back.

A compact chainset is a good compromise between race gearing and a triple. You’ll have speed on the flat, but you’ll be able to climb on it to.

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

You & Your Bike

  • Seat, Handlebars & Cleats should all be set correctly to give you maximum comfort.
  • You should be used to riding it
  • You should be familiar with it.
  • You should know how to change a tyre or repair a puncture.
  • If you are using clipless pedals, then you should be familiar with them.

You might find the mountain bike “SPD” Pedals are more suitable for you if you are a novice rider.

 

3 Bolt Road / Shoe Pedal system, will give you a better pedal platform.

 

  • Shimano SPD – SL
  • LOOK

Are the two most popular systems.

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

A Suggested Training Plan

January / February / March

You should be riding twice a week and be at the point where 25 – 30 miles is achievable without needing to stop.

Goal – Complete Lionheart Sportive Standard Route ( 60 miles ) in March.

 

April

Riding 3 Times ( 25 – 30 miles each ride ) a week + One long ride of 40 – 60 miles at a weekend.

Goal – Complete Circle Sportive Bath – Standard Route

 

May

Riding 4 Times a week  ( 25 – 30 miles each ride ) + One long ride of 60+ miles at a weekend.

Goal – Complete Jurassic Beast Sportive – Standard Route

Goal – Complete 1 of the 3 Days of The Tour of Wessex ( Standard Route )

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

Bike Fitness

You need to be “Bike Fit”, you won’t get this by going to the gym, or spinning classes. You need to put the miles in on the road. This should include plenty of hilly routes. TWWB is not a flat ride. There’s plenty of climbing to be done.

If you can get to the top of King Alfred’s Tower, without having to walk, that is a reasonable guide to the sort of hills you are going to come across. You should make sure you include this climb in your training rides.

You should be aiming to be able to complete a 60-mile ride with hills in it, in around 4 – 5 hrs by this point. Average speed at around 15 mph.

I know this sounds tough,  but if you can get yourself to the point where you can do the above. You are going to be able to complete TWWB and not have to worry too much about your physical fitness.

 

Written by Dave Gillard

Food & Drink – Fuelling Your Ride

Food & Drink

You’ll need to think about how you fuel during each day, bearing in mind that you need to also be thinking about the days to come and not just focusing on that day’s ride.

 

Drink

You’ll need an energy or electrolyte drink in your bottles.

Don’t rely on just plain water or squash it won’t replace the salts your body sweats out.

If you feel thirsty you are already dehydrated by that point. So try to drink little and often. A drink every 20 minutes will help.

If your urine is the colour of rusty water, you are dehydrated! Don’t let it get this far.

 

You’ll be burning 3000 to 4000 calories per day.

Energy Gel’s / Sports Bars are the best way to get calories into you. So you should have a plentiful supply of these with you and you should have done a couple of test rides using them. This is to ensure that your body can deal with them and that they don’t upset your stomach.

Remember you need salt as well as sugar. Peanuts and Crisps are a good way of getting this back into your system.

 

Don’t skip breakfast

Make sure you eat a reasonable lunch, but bear in mind that eating a big meal at lunchtime and then riding 30 – 40 miles in the afternoon might end up making you feel sick.

When you finish that’s day riding, try and get a recovery drink into you ASAP. There’s a 20 minute Golden Window of recovery where you can jump-start the recovery process when you finish a ride.

Eat a decent evening meal. This will help you recover and get you ready for the next day!

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

Training Advice

I cannot underestimate just how important it is to do the miles in your training.

The earlier we finish each day, the earlier we can start to relax, we can refuel and get an early night’s sleep.

If you aren’t bike fit you’ll struggle, it will mean long long days in the saddle, that you then are limited in terms of recovery time.

This will mean you find your tiredness builds up over each day, so each day gets a little harder, each day gets longer, each day you struggle more on the hills.

Finishing each day’s ride at a decent time, not only allows your body to recover, but also allows your mind to recover as well. It’s just as much of a mental challenge as it is a physical one.

This is also why you should be able to ride 60 miles in a day without too much struggle.

This is also why that you should be able to ride 30 – 40 miles without needing to stop for a rest.

Stopping/starting means you’ll get cold, which means your legs get stiff, which means its hard to get going again.

Also stopping does not allow your body to process the lactic acid build up in your muscles. Again which means you get stiff and your legs hurt when you start again after a long break.

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

Hydration

Hydrate properly, this includes the days leading up to TWWB. Your wee should always be almost clear if it is not you are dehydrated and this will affect your performance. You will get headaches and feel nauseas.

Hydration should not always be energy drinks. This can give you the shits very inconvenient on the bike. For every bottle of energy drink you should consume one of just water. This applies both on and off the bike.

Training

Yes, you will need to train!

The Broom Wagon

Getting in the Broom Wagon

You might find that you get to the point where you feel you cannot continue that day’s ride.

 

You might find that as a team we are concerned for the health or well being of one rider.

 

It might be that such is your pace, the group feel that you will not complete the days ride whilst it is daylight or that you would not get to the overnight stop with enough time to allow you to recover for the next day.

 

If you decide to get in the broom wagon, there is no shame in it. If you are asked to get in the broom wagon, please don’t take it personally.

 

It’s not something done or to be done lightly and there really will a genuine concern for your safety if somebody asks you to get in the van.

 

If you have done the right training and enough of it, then you should never get to this point anyway.

 

The Route

The route for 2020

As TWWB 2020 is our 10 year anniversary we want the event to go off without a hitch.

Currently, we are revising ideas on TWWB 2020’s route and we will post a few ideas on the forum once we have something to show.

Mapping and GPX files

All riders are required to follow the official route of The Wrong Way Back.

To do this we supply the route broken down into stages (days), each stage if supplied via a .GPX file from the website 2 weeks before the event.

We try to take every step in ensuring the route is correct, but as with all things can go wrong. So each morning during the event we will hold a briefing to make sure no route change are in place due to roadworks etc.

Your Bike

Your bikes condition

  • Should be in good mechanical order.
  • The Gears should work.
  • The Brakes should work. Brake pads should have plenty of life in them.
  • Wheels should be straight, no buckles or loose spokes.
  • Tyres should be in good condition, free from cuts, rips etc.
  • Should be the right size for you.
  • Ideally, it should be a road bike.
  • You don’t need this year’s model.
  • It doesn’t have to be all singing all dancing.
  • It doesn’t need to be carbon fibre.
  • It doesn’t need to cost thousands of pounds.

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

 

What your bike needs to do

Get you to the finish

Have sensible gearing on it, that you can get up hills on.

 

Written by Dave Gillard

If you struggle with hills

  • There’s no shame in having a triple on the front.
  • Fit something bigger than a 25 tooth sprocket on the back.

A compact chainset is a good compromise between race gearing and a triple. You’ll have speed on the flat, but you’ll be able to climb on it to.

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

You & Your Bike

  • Seat, Handlebars & Cleats should all be set correctly to give you maximum comfort.
  • You should be used to riding it
  • You should be familiar with it.
  • You should know how to change a tyre or repair a puncture.
  • If you are using clipless pedals, then you should be familiar with them.

You might find the mountain bike “SPD” Pedals are more suitable for you if you are a novice rider.

 

3 Bolt Road / Shoe Pedal system, will give you a better pedal platform.

 

  • Shimano SPD – SL
  • LOOK

Are the two most popular systems.

 

 

Written by Dave Gillard

Equipment and spares to be carried on your Bike

  • Two Bottle Cages
  • 2 x Spare Inner Tubes
  • 1 x Multi-Tool
  • 1 x Puncture Repair Kit
  • 1 x Pump or Co2 Inflator
  • A cycling computer that functions and will display your current speed. This is handy if you are asked to ride on the front of a group as this can be used to hold a steady pace.

 

There will be a support van with us, but it would be useful to have all of this in case you get separated from the group.

 

Written by Dave Gillard